AH In The News

Altadena was opened as a subdivision in late 1887 by John and Fred Woodbury from Marshalltown, Iowa. The Woodburys envisioned a millionaires’ rural suburb north of busy Pasadena, hoping to add to the wealthy class already gathering here, including Col. Charles Greene and Andrew McNally. Their timing was off, the real estate bubble burst in 1888, and the region was thrown into an economic panic that grew worse as it merged into a great national depression lasting through much of the 1890s. A bright spot in this period was the development of Thaddeus Lowe’s elegant mountain railway, which created a connection from Los Angeles though Pasadena and up to Altadena and beyond, to the many hotels and camps in the mountains. There, temperance was not an issue.

Altadenans Know Why Water is Worth Fighting For

Altadenans Know Why Water is Worth Fighting For

Since water’s for fighting here in the Golden State, Altadenans are doing a very good job of holding up their part of the California bargain.

As an unincorporated area with a strong local identity but just an advisory-only Town Council to elect — along with a Los Angeles County supervisor with 2 million other constituents — Altadenans have always been good at shows of self-governance that involve simply showing up.

Altadena Heritage Plays Key Role in Preservation of Historic Torrey Pine?

Altadena Heritage Plays Key Role in Preservation of Historic Torrey Pine?

Those seeking to preserve a historic tree on the Scripps/Kellogg estate in Altadena got some good news on May 31 when Altadena Heritage recognized the 86-year-old Torrey pine as a winner of its inaugural Big Tree Contest.

Meanwhile, the family of the late Takeo and Fumiko Yuge continued to pack up decades of belongings from a cottage on the property that was built in the 1920s. Sisters Cindy Yuge, Joyce Yuge, Carolyn Yuge and Nadine Ishizu did not attend the event, saying they were trying to meet the deadline to vacate the house. Among the items to be packed were family heirlooms dating back to the prewar years as well as artifacts from the wartime camps.

Golden Poppy Awards – Pasadena Now Article

Golden Poppy Awards – Pasadena Now Article

About 110 people attended the 11th annual Golden Poppy Awards and Garden Celebration on the Old California style grounds of Ed Ellis’s home by Millard Canyon. Altadena Heritage served a groaning board of sandwiches, snacks, curry, and desserts. Mark Jilg of Craftsman Brewing Company graciously sponsored and poured his famous handcrafted Poppyfields Ale. Board member Gail Casburn presided over a selection of delicious French wines from her Altadena Wine and Ale House.

Community Calls for Greener Approach to cleaning out Devil’s Gate Dam in Pasadena

Community Calls for Greener Approach to cleaning out Devil’s Gate Dam in Pasadena

The great pioneers of Pasadena described the Hahamongna watershed and the Arroyo Seco as a place where trout swam in crisp waters, webs of flowery vines and oaks blotted out the sky and hunters scored bears and foxes for display in their Los Angeles homes. However, the connection between downtown L.A. and nearby, natural playlands has been severed by 100 years of county dam projects, concrete channelization of waterways and arsonist-fed wildfires.

Altadena Chamber names Mark Goldschmidt Citizen of the Year

Altadena Chamber names Mark Goldschmidt Citizen of the Year

The Altadena Chamber of Commerce and Civic Association has named a long-time planning and preservation activist as Altadena’s 2013 Citizen of the Year.
Altadena Heritage Chairman Mark Goldschmidt, a retired landscape architect, was named Altadena’s Citizen of the Year for his work on the town council’s Land Use Committee and as a board member and chairman of Altadena Heritage. Goldschmidt’s honor is notable in that he is married to last year’s Citizen of the Year, local historian Michele Zack.

Altadena Heritage on Facebook

Altadena Heritage on Facebook

At Altadena Heritage we put on events and programs every year. Our board of directors – a varying group who have joined because they love where we live and want to help Altadena become a more lively and vibrant community. Check us out on Facebook

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